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COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

Organizational change management (OCM) focuses on helping people adapt to change. Research shows that by acknowledging the importance of OCM and taking steps to address the people side of change, organizations will be 4 times more likely to be successful.[i]

There are several change management methodologies that can be used to help guide stakeholders when planning the steps to help people adapt to changes. The COBIT® 5 materials mention John Kotter’s 8-step process,[ii] and the change enablement ring of the COBIT® implementation life cycle is aligned to John Kotter’s work.

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To read the rest of this artcle, come back on 25 September. 

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RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

I like the acknowledgement of the people side of process. Experience with Six Sigma quality improvements when addressing the quality of people executing on processes lead to a top flight performance near 2 sigma of quality or a single nine of quality for the finest world class teams. Human effort, will and training face a diminishing return unless outside supports for them are created. Consider that technological assistance of optimal performing teams can achieve higher levels of excellence. But, simple policy requirement matched with human grit, excellent team work and great training can have moments in the sun above stable performance but appear to not be far superior in excellence than about 96%. Simply say that something is policy, training people and inspiring great teamwork can help a quick rise to about 1 sigma gain in quality near 84% reliability. Smart controls combine the human factor with technological supports that assist rather than replace humanity. A team of great chess players assisted by a computer can always out perform a computer alone. The human factor is vital to consider and assist if excellence rather than diminishing returns is the true goal.
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/21/2017 9:16:15 AM Quote
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RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

Read the full article here: http://www.isaca.org/Knowledge-Center/Research/Documents/COBIT-Focus-Focus-on-COBIT-Adoption-Rather-Than-Implementation-5_nlt_Eng_0917.pdf
Daniel362Energizer at 9/25/2017 11:57:02 AM Quote
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(1 ratings)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

The following is a Process Excellence article looking at organizational management of change. With very slight levels of consideration enhancement in adoption of COBIT could be improved beyond the level guided by the article above. https://www.isixsigma.com/new-to-six-sigma/deployment/10-keys-successful-transformation/
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/25/2017 2:59:01 PM Quote
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(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

I like the acknowledgement of the people side of process. Experience with Six Sigma quality improvements when addressing the quality of people executing on processes lead to a top flight performance near 2 sigma of quality or a single nine of quality for the finest world class teams. Human effort, will and training face a diminishing return unless outside supports for them are created. Consider that technological assistance of optimal performing teams can achieve higher levels of excellence. But, simple policy requirement matched with human grit, excellent team work and great training can have moments in the sun above stable performance but appear to not be far superior in excellence than about 96%. Simply say that something is policy, training people and inspiring great teamwork can help a quick rise to about 1 sigma gain in quality near 84% reliability. Smart controls combine the human factor with technological supports that assist rather than replace humanity. A team of great chess players assisted by a computer can always out perform a computer alone. The human factor is vital to consider and assist if excellence rather than diminishing returns is the true goal.
Don Turnblade at 9/21/2017 9:16:15 AM
The author above is actually focused on Process Excellence in medical delivery. But the following extracted parts for a repeating lesson learned form a substantial number of process adoption efforts where CoBit process adoption would be simply another effort taking world class lessons learned to heart and benefiting from that experience. Keys to Successful Transformation Highly successful healthcare organizations – like those which are inching their way up on the top 100 list, for example – have embraced many of these 10 keys to successful transformation: 1.Define a vision for the future and know the organization’s current state by analyzing market, culture, technology, community needs and opportunities for improvement. 2.Develop a communication plan to reach all levels of the organization. 3.Visibly champion the cause showing strong leadership involvement and support. 4.Build internal skills to solve problems and lead change efforts (i.e., Six Sigma, Lean, change management, simulation modeling, etc.). 5.Seek early, measurable wins to build momentum, overcome skepticism and encourage participation. 6.Take a balanced, holistic approach to ensure that gains in one area do not cause problems in another. 7.Reach out and learn from others who have embarked on similar initiatives – whether inside or outside the organization’s particular industry. 8.Establish alignment and accountability by linking major goals and core business metrics to projects and performance. 9.Create monitoring mechanisms to ensure that results are maintained. 10.Recognize, reward and celebrate success on a regular basis. Vision, Framework and Culture Change Any transformation must begin with a vision. Most executive teams have already crafted a mission statement and usually have a clear vision as to where they want to take their organizations. Turning that vision into reality is a bigger challenge – especially in today’s complex environment. Successful improvement initiatives will seek a sense of balance through an interwoven framework that addresses the technical and cultural aspects of change. For some, this framework has included methods such as Lean, Six Sigma, change management and leadership development. These are complementary elements that can be used throughout the healthcare enterprise to drive long-term results. Transformation is not about training, and it is not even just about the individual tools themselves. It is about changing the culture and developing enough experience to know which tool to apply to each issue. The figure below illustrates a series of integrated steps or phases that help to build a strong framework and lead to long-term results. Culture Change Culture Change Some problems may require the rigor of Six Sigma or Lean, while others may simply be a matter of making a decision – with many variations in between. Similar to the concept of giving the right care to the right patient at the right time, it is important to know which tool should be applied to each problem-solving opportunity. Transformation is a journey, rather than a destination. The 10 keys to successful transformation represent some guideposts along the way and are based on lessons from successful healthcare providers. They also align with, and are complementary to, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria.
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/25/2017 3:04:39 PM Quote
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(1 ratings)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

There are many different frameworks that can be used for organizational change management.  The results of addressing the human side of change can be dramatic as Don points out in his earlier posts.  Whether you are adopting COBIT, change is occurring due to a project, or you are adopting some other best practice, focusing on adoption rather than implementation will yield much stronger results.  

Addressing the people side of change is much more complicated than just offering them training or sending them an email.  Those affected by change should be engaged throughout the initiative.  We also need to plan for how we can embed the change into the fabric of the organization once the changes are live.
PErskineLively at 9/25/2017 6:08:57 PM Quote
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(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

How have you addressed the adoption of change when implementing COBIT?  Did your project address adoption or just implementation?
PErskineLively at 9/26/2017 6:20:32 PM Quote
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(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

How have you addressed the adoption of change when implementing COBIT?  Did your project address adoption or just implementation?
PErskineLively at 9/26/2017 6:20:32 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

There are many different frameworks that can be used for organizational change management.  The results of addressing the human side of change can be dramatic as Don points out in his earlier posts.  Whether you are adopting COBIT, change is occurring due to a project, or you are adopting some other best practice, focusing on adoption rather than implementation will yield much stronger results.  

Addressing the people side of change is much more complicated than just offering them training or sending them an email.  Those affected by change should be engaged throughout the initiative.  We also need to plan for how we can embed the change into the fabric of the organization once the changes are live.
PErskineLively at 9/25/2017 6:08:57 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

I like the acknowledgement of the people side of process. Experience with Six Sigma quality improvements when addressing the quality of people executing on processes lead to a top flight performance near 2 sigma of quality or a single nine of quality for the finest world class teams. Human effort, will and training face a diminishing return unless outside supports for them are created. Consider that technological assistance of optimal performing teams can achieve higher levels of excellence. But, simple policy requirement matched with human grit, excellent team work and great training can have moments in the sun above stable performance but appear to not be far superior in excellence than about 96%. Simply say that something is policy, training people and inspiring great teamwork can help a quick rise to about 1 sigma gain in quality near 84% reliability. Smart controls combine the human factor with technological supports that assist rather than replace humanity. A team of great chess players assisted by a computer can always out perform a computer alone. The human factor is vital to consider and assist if excellence rather than diminishing returns is the true goal.
Don Turnblade at 9/21/2017 9:16:15 AM
The author above is actually focused on Process Excellence in medical delivery. But the following extracted parts for a repeating lesson learned form a substantial number of process adoption efforts where CoBit process adoption would be simply another effort taking world class lessons learned to heart and benefiting from that experience. Keys to Successful Transformation Highly successful healthcare organizations – like those which are inching their way up on the top 100 list, for example – have embraced many of these 10 keys to successful transformation: 1.Define a vision for the future and know the organization’s current state by analyzing market, culture, technology, community needs and opportunities for improvement. 2.Develop a communication plan to reach all levels of the organization. 3.Visibly champion the cause showing strong leadership involvement and support. 4.Build internal skills to solve problems and lead change efforts (i.e., Six Sigma, Lean, change management, simulation modeling, etc.). 5.Seek early, measurable wins to build momentum, overcome skepticism and encourage participation. 6.Take a balanced, holistic approach to ensure that gains in one area do not cause problems in another. 7.Reach out and learn from others who have embarked on similar initiatives – whether inside or outside the organization’s particular industry. 8.Establish alignment and accountability by linking major goals and core business metrics to projects and performance. 9.Create monitoring mechanisms to ensure that results are maintained. 10.Recognize, reward and celebrate success on a regular basis. Vision, Framework and Culture Change Any transformation must begin with a vision. Most executive teams have already crafted a mission statement and usually have a clear vision as to where they want to take their organizations. Turning that vision into reality is a bigger challenge – especially in today’s complex environment. Successful improvement initiatives will seek a sense of balance through an interwoven framework that addresses the technical and cultural aspects of change. For some, this framework has included methods such as Lean, Six Sigma, change management and leadership development. These are complementary elements that can be used throughout the healthcare enterprise to drive long-term results. Transformation is not about training, and it is not even just about the individual tools themselves. It is about changing the culture and developing enough experience to know which tool to apply to each issue. The figure below illustrates a series of integrated steps or phases that help to build a strong framework and lead to long-term results. Culture Change Culture Change Some problems may require the rigor of Six Sigma or Lean, while others may simply be a matter of making a decision – with many variations in between. Similar to the concept of giving the right care to the right patient at the right time, it is important to know which tool should be applied to each problem-solving opportunity. Transformation is a journey, rather than a destination. The 10 keys to successful transformation represent some guideposts along the way and are based on lessons from successful healthcare providers. They also align with, and are complementary to, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria.
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/25/2017 3:04:39 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(1 ratings)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

The following is a Process Excellence article looking at organizational management of change. With very slight levels of consideration enhancement in adoption of COBIT could be improved beyond the level guided by the article above. https://www.isixsigma.com/new-to-six-sigma/deployment/10-keys-successful-transformation/
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/25/2017 2:59:01 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

Read the full article here: http://www.isaca.org/Knowledge-Center/Research/Documents/COBIT-Focus-Focus-on-COBIT-Adoption-Rather-Than-Implementation-5_nlt_Eng_0917.pdf
Daniel362Energizer at 9/25/2017 11:57:02 AM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(1 ratings)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

I like the acknowledgement of the people side of process. Experience with Six Sigma quality improvements when addressing the quality of people executing on processes lead to a top flight performance near 2 sigma of quality or a single nine of quality for the finest world class teams. Human effort, will and training face a diminishing return unless outside supports for them are created. Consider that technological assistance of optimal performing teams can achieve higher levels of excellence. But, simple policy requirement matched with human grit, excellent team work and great training can have moments in the sun above stable performance but appear to not be far superior in excellence than about 96%. Simply say that something is policy, training people and inspiring great teamwork can help a quick rise to about 1 sigma gain in quality near 84% reliability. Smart controls combine the human factor with technological supports that assist rather than replace humanity. A team of great chess players assisted by a computer can always out perform a computer alone. The human factor is vital to consider and assist if excellence rather than diminishing returns is the true goal.
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/21/2017 9:16:15 AM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

Read the full article here: http://www.isaca.org/Knowledge-Center/Research/Documents/COBIT-Focus-Focus-on-COBIT-Adoption-Rather-Than-Implementation-5_nlt_Eng_0917.pdf
Daniel362Energizer at 9/25/2017 11:57:02 AM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(1 ratings)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

I like the acknowledgement of the people side of process. Experience with Six Sigma quality improvements when addressing the quality of people executing on processes lead to a top flight performance near 2 sigma of quality or a single nine of quality for the finest world class teams. Human effort, will and training face a diminishing return unless outside supports for them are created. Consider that technological assistance of optimal performing teams can achieve higher levels of excellence. But, simple policy requirement matched with human grit, excellent team work and great training can have moments in the sun above stable performance but appear to not be far superior in excellence than about 96%. Simply say that something is policy, training people and inspiring great teamwork can help a quick rise to about 1 sigma gain in quality near 84% reliability. Smart controls combine the human factor with technological supports that assist rather than replace humanity. A team of great chess players assisted by a computer can always out perform a computer alone. The human factor is vital to consider and assist if excellence rather than diminishing returns is the true goal.
Don Turnblade at 9/21/2017 9:16:15 AM
The author above is actually focused on Process Excellence in medical delivery. But the following extracted parts for a repeating lesson learned form a substantial number of process adoption efforts where CoBit process adoption would be simply another effort taking world class lessons learned to heart and benefiting from that experience. Keys to Successful Transformation Highly successful healthcare organizations – like those which are inching their way up on the top 100 list, for example – have embraced many of these 10 keys to successful transformation: 1.Define a vision for the future and know the organization’s current state by analyzing market, culture, technology, community needs and opportunities for improvement. 2.Develop a communication plan to reach all levels of the organization. 3.Visibly champion the cause showing strong leadership involvement and support. 4.Build internal skills to solve problems and lead change efforts (i.e., Six Sigma, Lean, change management, simulation modeling, etc.). 5.Seek early, measurable wins to build momentum, overcome skepticism and encourage participation. 6.Take a balanced, holistic approach to ensure that gains in one area do not cause problems in another. 7.Reach out and learn from others who have embarked on similar initiatives – whether inside or outside the organization’s particular industry. 8.Establish alignment and accountability by linking major goals and core business metrics to projects and performance. 9.Create monitoring mechanisms to ensure that results are maintained. 10.Recognize, reward and celebrate success on a regular basis. Vision, Framework and Culture Change Any transformation must begin with a vision. Most executive teams have already crafted a mission statement and usually have a clear vision as to where they want to take their organizations. Turning that vision into reality is a bigger challenge – especially in today’s complex environment. Successful improvement initiatives will seek a sense of balance through an interwoven framework that addresses the technical and cultural aspects of change. For some, this framework has included methods such as Lean, Six Sigma, change management and leadership development. These are complementary elements that can be used throughout the healthcare enterprise to drive long-term results. Transformation is not about training, and it is not even just about the individual tools themselves. It is about changing the culture and developing enough experience to know which tool to apply to each issue. The figure below illustrates a series of integrated steps or phases that help to build a strong framework and lead to long-term results. Culture Change Culture Change Some problems may require the rigor of Six Sigma or Lean, while others may simply be a matter of making a decision – with many variations in between. Similar to the concept of giving the right care to the right patient at the right time, it is important to know which tool should be applied to each problem-solving opportunity. Transformation is a journey, rather than a destination. The 10 keys to successful transformation represent some guideposts along the way and are based on lessons from successful healthcare providers. They also align with, and are complementary to, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria.
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/25/2017 3:04:39 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(1 ratings)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

I like the acknowledgement of the people side of process. Experience with Six Sigma quality improvements when addressing the quality of people executing on processes lead to a top flight performance near 2 sigma of quality or a single nine of quality for the finest world class teams. Human effort, will and training face a diminishing return unless outside supports for them are created. Consider that technological assistance of optimal performing teams can achieve higher levels of excellence. But, simple policy requirement matched with human grit, excellent team work and great training can have moments in the sun above stable performance but appear to not be far superior in excellence than about 96%. Simply say that something is policy, training people and inspiring great teamwork can help a quick rise to about 1 sigma gain in quality near 84% reliability. Smart controls combine the human factor with technological supports that assist rather than replace humanity. A team of great chess players assisted by a computer can always out perform a computer alone. The human factor is vital to consider and assist if excellence rather than diminishing returns is the true goal.
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/21/2017 9:16:15 AM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

The following is a Process Excellence article looking at organizational management of change. With very slight levels of consideration enhancement in adoption of COBIT could be improved beyond the level guided by the article above. https://www.isixsigma.com/new-to-six-sigma/deployment/10-keys-successful-transformation/
Don TurnbladeEnergizer at 9/25/2017 2:59:01 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

There are many different frameworks that can be used for organizational change management.  The results of addressing the human side of change can be dramatic as Don points out in his earlier posts.  Whether you are adopting COBIT, change is occurring due to a project, or you are adopting some other best practice, focusing on adoption rather than implementation will yield much stronger results.  

Addressing the people side of change is much more complicated than just offering them training or sending them an email.  Those affected by change should be engaged throughout the initiative.  We also need to plan for how we can embed the change into the fabric of the organization once the changes are live.
PErskineLively at 9/25/2017 6:08:57 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: COBIT Focus - Focus on COBIT Adoption Rather Than Implementation

How have you addressed the adoption of change when implementing COBIT?  Did your project address adoption or just implementation?
PErskineLively at 9/26/2017 6:20:32 PM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

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