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Dual Authentication Fine Line

Hi All

I am interested in what people think about Dual Authentication.

What would you define as dual authentication from external of a company's network:

Option One: You are required to provide dual authentication prior to having access to a corporate network and then authenticate to an application on entry to the network.
Option Two: You provide one level of authentication to access the network and one to access the application you want.

What do you think and what do you see as the best practices?

Thanks for input.

Regards

David
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Comments

RE: Dual Authentication Fine Line

Interesting question. The main question is: what do users like most in order to work securely? In a hospital environment I can not imagine a doctor needing to enter dual authentication prior to accessing the network and again authentication for accessing each application. For me it is highly dependent on the actual user working environment in combination with the sensitivity of the information within the network boundaries. Option One: You are required to provide dual authentication prior to having access to a corporate network and then authenticate to an application on entry to the network. Looks most interesting, however, why re-authenticate after accessing the network? Dual authentication implies two different authentication mechanisms (something you know + something you have or are). Mostly applied in banking environments, but also more expensive. Option Two: You provide one level of authentication to access the network and one to access the application you want. This is the current low cost approach.
Marc VaelEnergizer at 6/14/2012 3:06:41 AM Quote
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(Unrated)

RE: Dual Authentication Fine Line

Interesting question. The main question is: what do users like most in order to work securely? In a hospital environment I can not imagine a doctor needing to enter dual authentication prior to accessing the network and again authentication for accessing each application. For me it is highly dependent on the actual user working environment in combination with the sensitivity of the information within the network boundaries. Option One: You are required to provide dual authentication prior to having access to a corporate network and then authenticate to an application on entry to the network. Looks most interesting, however, why re-authenticate after accessing the network? Dual authentication implies two different authentication mechanisms (something you know + something you have or are). Mostly applied in banking environments, but also more expensive. Option Two: You provide one level of authentication to access the network and one to access the application you want. This is the current low cost approach.
Marc VaelEnergizer at 6/14/2012 3:06:41 AM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

RE: Dual Authentication Fine Line

Interesting question. The main question is: what do users like most in order to work securely? In a hospital environment I can not imagine a doctor needing to enter dual authentication prior to accessing the network and again authentication for accessing each application. For me it is highly dependent on the actual user working environment in combination with the sensitivity of the information within the network boundaries. Option One: You are required to provide dual authentication prior to having access to a corporate network and then authenticate to an application on entry to the network. Looks most interesting, however, why re-authenticate after accessing the network? Dual authentication implies two different authentication mechanisms (something you know + something you have or are). Mostly applied in banking environments, but also more expensive. Option Two: You provide one level of authentication to access the network and one to access the application you want. This is the current low cost approach.
Marc VaelEnergizer at 6/14/2012 3:06:41 AM Quote
You must sign in to rate content.
(Unrated)

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