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The Beginnings of a New Privacy Framework Through NIST

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| Posted at 3:01 PM by ISACA News | Category: Privacy | Permalink | Email this Post | Comments (0)

NIST conducted a workshop on 16 October in Austin, Texas, USA, to discuss plans for a voluntary privacy framework, and attendees had the opportunity to have a robust discussion about what such a framework should entail. The workshop was attended by individuals from industry, academia, and government.

The need for a framework, according to NIST, is because we live in an “increasingly connected and complex environment with cutting-edge technologies such as the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence raising further concerns about an individual’s privacy. A framework that could be used across industries would be valuable in helping organizations identify and manage their privacy risks.” It would also assist an organization in preparing and maintaining a comprehensive privacy plan.

“I think being able to have guidance at a federal level that takes into consideration key other privacy legislation and regulations as well as standards will be important,” said Paula deWitte, computer scientist, author, and privacy attorney. “The comment at the workshop about relentless interoperability of standards and the framework will be key to its usability.”

NIST discussed how the process for creating the privacy framework was largely aligned with how its Cybersecurity Framework was created, with collaboration from the public, and iteratively. NIST envisions the privacy framework as being “developed through an open, transparent process, using common and accessible language, being adaptable to many different organizations, technologies, lifecycle phases, sectors and uses and to serve as a living document.”

“The Cybersecurity Framework is more about critical infrastructure. Privacy is a different beast, and frankly, a bigger lift. We don’t even have a clear definition for privacy. On top of that, privacy is multi-dimensional. One must look at privacy from its impact on the individual, groups, and society,” said deWitte.

“The major elephant in the room identified at the hearing is that we don’t have a grip on what data needs to be protected and where the company’s data is. By that I mean, we don’t fully understand what data must be kept private and we must consider that organizations must be in complete control of data throughout its entire lifecycle including from procuring it, to storing it, to sharing it (as appropriate) to disposing of it,” said Harvey Nusz, Manager, GDPR, and ISACA Houston Chapter President.

With more work to do on the general strategic front, the group determined the overall approach for the framework would be enterprise risk management, a focus both Nusz and deWitte applaud, while offering words of caution.

“I agree that we need to fit the framework into an enterprise risk management approach, but how do we actually define and conduct risk management? Risk management encompasses all types of enterprise risk, so there is the issue of how one defines risk. Is anyone using a good methodology for risk management we can all get behind?” said deWitte.

“Every organization should at a minimum create a risk register,” said Nusz. “That needs to be part of privacy planning.”

The workshop attendees discussed that the risk-based approach represents the reality that privacy has moved beyond a compliance, checklist mentality. It is now a viable business model with data considered an asset. The key is identifying the acceptable level of risk and owning responsibility if something goes wrong.

“This creates legal questions because our laws are written for the physical world, but if my identity is stolen, it can encompass legal issues of including jurisdiction, standing and damages. Who has jurisdiction in the cyber world? Law always lags technology, so all of this has yet to be determined,” said deWitte.

“We have an opportunity to build trust with consumers through the way we handle their privacy,” said Nusz. “I look forward to this challenge and working with NIST to see it recognized.”

Some of the ideas for how to put the framework in practice to improve trust with consumers included: incorporating human-centered research in work done to protect privacy, attempts to de-identify information and be as transparent as possible with the process, as well as leveraging privacy enhancing techniques.

NIST will take the feedback from the hearing and build an initial outline, which it will present at a workshop in early 2019. To stay current on the privacy initiative, please visit the NIST Privacy Framework website.

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